Never believe the hype

Apple may be focusing on ensuring customers that their personal data stored on iOS and OS X devices is safer and more private than ever, but that doesn’t mean law enforcement and spy agencies won’t be able to access iOS 8 devices anymore. Wired points us to a new blog post published by security researcher Jonathan Zdziarski, who says that regardless of the steps Apple has taken to further protect personal data and regardless of whether the company is willing to help such agencies, they’ll still be able to force their way into an iPhone 6 or any iOS device running Apple’s latest operating system.

Zdziarski advises users to PIN-protect their iOS 8 devices at all times, to power down computers (rather than just putting them to sleep) when not in use and especially when travelling, and even turn off iPhones when going through airport security – to read his detailed take on iOS 8 security follow the source links below.

No, the Koch brothers caught lying about climate change. Google and Microsoft were pretty naive to get suckered into ALEC

Google is to stop funding a major conservative group over its stance on climate change. Speaking in a radio interview with NPR's Diane Rehm, Google’s executive chairman Eric Schmidt said that Google would not be renewing its membership to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), because the group was “literally lying” by opposing efforts to reduce global warming. The right-leaning ALEC, which has received donations from fossil fuel companies such as Exxon Mobil, has fought against the US government’s efforts to pursue renewable energy sources, battled against regulations for coal power plants, tried to get ecological activists classified as terrorists, and questioned climate change research.

Google’s executive chairman clearly stated Google’s stance on the issue, saying that the facts of climate change “are not in question any more,” and that the company “should not be aligned with such people” for the sake of future generations. “Everyone understands climate change is occurring, and the people who oppose it are really hurting our children and our grandchildren and making the world a much worse place.” He justified Google’s belief in climate change, saying the company “has a very strong view that we should make decisions in politics based on facts.”

Lord Nicholas Stern: The state of the climate — and what we might do about it

You can’t make a peace treaty with the planet. You can’t negotiate with the laws of physics. You’re in there. You’re stuck. Those are the stakes we’re playing for, and that’s why we have to make this second transformation, the climate transformation, and move to a low-carbon economy.

We need political pressure to build. We need leaders to step up. We can have better growth, better climate, a better world. We can make, by managing those two transformations well, the next 100 years the best of centuries. If we make a mess of it, we, you and me, if we make a mess of it, if we don’t manage those transformations properly, it will be, the next 100 years will be the worst of centuries. That’s the major conclusion of the report on the economy and climate chaired by ex-President Felipe Calderón of Mexico, and I co-chaired that with him, and we handed that report yesterday here in New York, in the United Nations Building to the Secretary-General of the U.N., Ban Ki-moon. We know that we can do this.

♥ But it would have been cheaper to buy a case. Hum, maybe that was Apple’s objective all along

How to fix iphone 6’s protruding camera

The industrial design of the iPhone 6 is close to flawless… Except for one flaw so weird, so major, that it’s maddening: The fact that the camera protrudes from the body of the phone, meaning it never lies completely flat and gets caught on all kinds of stuff. The perfectionists at PeripateticPandas have a solution, and it involves industrial machinery.

This video, pointed out by Ambruso on Twitter, begins as a charmingly perfect impersonation of Jony Ive’s distinctive vocal cadence (“seamlesslyintegrating… agorgeousdisplay… into an aluminium body”) and quickly spirals out of control into a nightmarish revenge fantasy against the Apple design team that decided this particular detail was OK.

The Rockefeller’s need to convince the Koch Brothers’ to do the same


Apple sold over 10 million new iPhone 6 and 6 plus units. That compares to more than 9 million for the iPhone 5s/5c launch and over 5 million for the iPhone 5. This chart gives you some historical context. Some analysts estimate that Apple could sell as many as 38 million units in the September quarter.  My friend Steve asked on Twitter, if there is something with an average selling price of $700 that has sold over 10 million units within three days? By Steve’s ASP math, that is a $7 billion weekend.

Apple sold over 10 million new iPhone 6 and 6 plus units. That compares to more than 9 million for the iPhone 5s/5c launch and over 5 million for the iPhone 5. This chart gives you some historical context. Some analysts estimate that Apple could sell as many as 38 million units in the September quarter.  My friend Steve asked on Twitter, if there is something with an average selling price of $700 that has sold over 10 million units within three days? By Steve’s ASP math, that is a $7 billion weekend.

Check out the rest of Nick Acosta’s cinerama images.

Forty eight years ago this week Star Trek debuted its first episode on NBC. The show, like all other shows at the time, was broadcast in the old style 4x3 aspect ratio. Using HD screen caps from my friends at Trekcore.com, I created this project of what the show would have looked like in Cinerama widescreen. As a kid the show always felt bigger and more epic than it appears to me as an adult. I was able to create these shots by waiting for the camera to pan and then I stitched the separate shots together. The result is pretty epic. It reminds me of the classic science fiction movies of the 50’s and 60’s. Suddenly the show has a “Forbidden Planet” vibe. Other shots remind me of how director Robert Wise would use a camera technique to keep the foreground and background elements in focus. 

Check out the rest of Nick Acosta’s cinerama images.

Forty eight years ago this week Star Trek debuted its first episode on NBC. The show, like all other shows at the time, was broadcast in the old style 4x3 aspect ratio. Using HD screen caps from my friends at Trekcore.com, I created this project of what the show would have looked like in Cinerama widescreen. As a kid the show always felt bigger and more epic than it appears to me as an adult. I was able to create these shots by waiting for the camera to pan and then I stitched the separate shots together. The result is pretty epic. It reminds me of the classic science fiction movies of the 50’s and 60’s. Suddenly the show has a “Forbidden Planet” vibe. Other shots remind me of how director Robert Wise would use a camera technique to keep the foreground and background elements in focus. 

scared yet?