Cali is a state emergency. Meanwhile “Rich People Are Trucking Their Own Water Into Drought-Ridden California

Before: Here, the Green Bridge passes over Lake Oroville near the Bidwell Marina in 2011. Notice the trees and shrubs that grow right against the man-made lake’s edge

After: Fast forward to 2014 and even the massive pillars holding up the bridge can be completely seen at the lakes edge, where a wide swath of parched dirt spans between what’s left of the water and the tree line

♥ 
Read Des’ post for the details of the following. Also read “Product Strategy Means Saying NO
  1. DOES IT FIT YOUR VISION?
  2. WILL IT STILL MATTER IN 5 YEARS?
  3. WILL EVERYONE BENEFIT FROM IT?
  4. WILL IT IMPROVE, COMPLEMENT OR INNOVATE ON THE  EXISTING WORKFLOW?
  5. DOES IT GROW THE BUSINESS?
  6. WILL IT GENERATE NEW MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT?
  7. IF IT SUCCEEDS, CAN WE SUPPORT & AFFORD IT?
  8. CAN WE DESIGN IT SO THAT REWARD IS GREATER THAN EFFORT?
  9. CAN WE DO IT WELL?
  10. CAN WE SCOPE IT WELL?

The trouble is, BMI is clearly not a perfect indicator of health; it’s just the easiest one. It doesn’t differentiate between muscle and fat content, so an athlete like  professional US women’s basketball player Ebony Hoffman could be classified as overweight. Hoffman is 6’2″ and weighs 215 lbs., which puts her at a 27.6 BMI.

Athlete or average citizen, the BMI isn’t the universal tool it’s been promoted to be. It doesn’t take into account age, gender and race, which has led to potentially misidentifying populations of African American people as overweight.

+1 @mathewi

Facebook’s latest update to its ranking algorithm is supposedly designed to combat “clickbait” headlines in the content shared on the network — but all it does is reinforce how little we know about how Facebook decides what we see and don’t see

In any case, the bottom line for both media sites and users alike is that Facebook’s algorithm is very similar to Google’s algorithm, in the sense that it’s a black box, one whose inner workings are almost totally inscrutable. Just as sites like Metafilter occasionally find that their traffic has fallen off a cliff due to some mysterious change in Google’s ranking methods, so Facebook routinely elevates or smothers certain types of content — a good example being the “social readers” that many media outlets such as The Guardian came out with in 2012, only to see their usefulness evaporate overnight after Facebook tweaked its algorithm.

But the reasons why Facebook chooses to highlight specific types of content and hide others remain completely hidden from users and publishers — and explanations like the one it gave for the latest change don’t really help that much, in part because they raise almost as many questions as they answer.

The practical impact of this algorithm-driven becomes obvious during an event like the demonstrations in Ferguson, Mo. While Twitter was filled with live reporting about the incident and its aftermath, many users complained that Facebook was almost silent on the news. Was that because of the way certain stories were shared? Was it because people didn’t click on Ferguson headlines? Or was it because Facebook chose to highlight uplifting personal stories instead of depressing and violent news events? No one knows.

Like a newspaper publisher with editors who choose which stories are important and which aren’t, Facebook decides what to show based on its own criteria — criteria that are largely unshared with the outside world, and therefore can only be inferred based on external signals. Is that a good thing or a bad thing? Ultimately, that’s for each user to determine for themselves. But the fact remains that what comes through Facebook is the site’s version of what you should be reading — and what you need to know about the world — not your version.


A new report finds that high-tech jobs pay on average $156,000 a year in San Francisco and $195,000 in the wider Silicon Valley area.
The revelations come from real estate firm, JLL, which analyzed the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs report [PDF]. To be sure, it’s not just high-tech workers cashing in. Silicon Valley interns are also making multiples of what the average San Francisco earns.

A new report finds that high-tech jobs pay on average $156,000 a year in San Francisco and $195,000 in the wider Silicon Valley area.

The revelations come from real estate firm, JLL, which analyzed the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs report [PDF]. To be sure, it’s not just high-tech workers cashing in. Silicon Valley interns are also making multiples of what the average San Francisco earns.

The mastermind behind ICREACH was recently retired NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander, who outlined his vision for the system in a classified 2006 letterto the then-Director of National Intelligence John Negroponte. The search tool, Alexander wrote, would “allow unprecedented volumes of communications metadata to be shared and analyzed,” opening up a “vast, rich source of information” for other agencies to exploit. By late 2007 the NSA reported to its employees that the system had gone live as a pilot program.

The NSA described ICREACH as a “one-stop shopping tool” for analyzing communications. The system would enable at least a 12-fold increase in the volume of metadata being shared between intelligence community agencies, the documentsstated. Using ICREACH, the NSA planned to boost the amount of communications “events” it shared with other U.S. government agencies from 50 billion to more than 850 billion, bolstering an older top-secret data sharing system named CRISSCROSS/PROTON, which was launched in the 1990s and managed by the CIA.

Infrastructure is infrastructure. What happens when you lose key operational people through out the company?

And speaking of California, let me try another tack.
This festive map shows seismic hazard in Northern California, where pretty much all the large Internet companies are based, along with a zillion startups. The ones that aren’t here have their headquarters in an even deadlier zone up in Cascadia.
Now of course, each company has four zillion datacenters, backed up across the world. But how much will that matter when there’s a major quake, and Silicon Valley can’t get to work for a month? All of these headquarters are going to be shut down for a long time when the Big One comes. You’re going to notice it.
So even if you don’t agree with my politics, maybe you’ll agree with my geology. Let’s not build a vast, distributed global network only to put everything in one place!

Infrastructure is infrastructure. What happens when you lose key operational people through out the company?

And speaking of California, let me try another tack.

This festive map shows seismic hazard in Northern California, where pretty much all the large Internet companies are based, along with a zillion startups. The ones that aren’t here have their headquarters in an even deadlier zone up in Cascadia.

Now of course, each company has four zillion datacenters, backed up across the world. But how much will that matter when there’s a major quake, and Silicon Valley can’t get to work for a month? All of these headquarters are going to be shut down for a long time when the Big One comes. You’re going to notice it.

So even if you don’t agree with my politics, maybe you’ll agree with my geology. Let’s not build a vast, distributed global network only to put everything in one place!

great analysis

1.  Content Prioritization

"While desktop Web sites often contain a wide range of content, mobile sites usually include only the most crucial functions and features—particularly those that leverage time and location…."

2.  Vertical Instead of Horizontal Navigation

"Vertical navigation has replaced horizontal navigation on more than 90% of the mobile sites I analyzed…."

3.  Bars, Tabs, and Hypertext

"We see much less hypertext on mobile pages. … Links instead appear in the form of bars, tabs, and buttons."

4.  Text and Graphics

"Designers often remove promotional or marketing graphics from the designs of mobile sites."

5.  Contextual and Global Navigation

"While global navigation is common on mobile sites, contextual navigation is not."

6.  Footers

"Mobile sites employ footers that provide access to content users often look for on a home page, keeping its links to a minimum, but they do not use footers containing quick links."

7.  Breadcrumbs

"Breadcrumbs rarely appear on mobiles sites, and there is usually no necessity for them."

8.  Progress Indicator

"When users must progress through multiple steps to complete a process … there is often a progress indicator at the top of the page to guide users through the process. Such progress indicators do not appear on mobile sites."

9.  Integration with Phone Functions

"While mobile platforms place many limitations on design and content, they also open up new opportunities that traditional Web sites cannot provide."

10.  Localized & Personalized Search

"Another area of opportunity that is unique to mobile sites is the use of geolocation services or support."

climateadaptation

climateadaptation:

Via The Guardian